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Trigger Points and Lower Back Pain

By Pressure Positive December 25, 2015 No comments

Trigger Points and Lower Back Pain

By Simeon Niel Asher

Lower Back Pain has reached epidemic proportions. Here we look at the part played by trigger points.

It has been suggested that low back pain is an inevitable result of walking upright (Harari). As the force of gravity acts upon the skeleton and its muscular and ligamentous armature, it is distributed via the fascia into three dimensions. Myers (2013) talks of an internal cohesion- compression of the body where it is both collapsing in on itself and pushing out from itself in a constant state of equilibrium, a concept called ‘tensegrity’. Tensegrity is seen nowhere better than in the spine.

If the spine were a straight, rigid stick it wouldn’t be able to compensate for the multiple forces acting upon it. Therefore it is specifically arranged in a series of curves (cervical and lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis). Along with the spinal discs, these curves are essential for shock absorption and are maintained by an interblend of muscles and ligaments that fire up in cyclical sequences.

Pathophysiology of Trigger Points

By Pressure Positive December 23, 2015 No comments

Sadly, too many therapists remain out of the loop, when it comes to understanding trigger points. In the case of some (mostly PT's, but others included) there is still a tremendous cynicism. This is generally because these therapists have received a negatively biased education, and have somehow avoided the opportunities to learn and explore trigger point therapy first hand.

For anyone willing to take the time to piece it all together, there is plenty of freely available research to support trigger point therapy. Mainstream acceptance of trigger point therapy has grown rapidly in recent years. We're committed to playing our part to push for the introduction of trigger point therapy as a standard teaching requirement for all manual therapists. 

In todays trigger point blog we take a deeper look at where trigger points come from.

Knock Out Plantar Fasciitis Pain with this Homerun Tip

By Pressure Positive September 19, 2014 No comments
The topic of this month, Plantar Fasciitis is a big deal. According to a Medscape overview, around 10% of the United States population experiences heel pain resulting in 1 million visits per year to medical professionals due to Plantar Fasciitis. Treatments cost us between $192 and $376 million dollars annually, consisting of injections, surgeries, steroids and physical therapy, with an average recovery time of 6 weeks. Recurrence of the condition is not uncommon.

Headache in Your Eye? Migraines? Blurred Vision? Could it Be a Trigger Point?

By Pressure Positive September 19, 2014 No comments
In this February issue of Muscle News, we will talk about the fascinating and often more debilitating problem of visual disturbances such as blurred vision and severe pain on the back of the eyeball itself. The muscle responsible for these nearly insufferable aspects of the migraine complex is called the Splenius Cervicis.

Misdiagnosed Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and the “Pinch Me” Nerve.

By Pressure Positive September 19, 2014 No comments
In this issue of Muscle News, we will address the irritating, painful and sometimes disabling condition of a nerve being compressed in our bodies. With even just a brief instant of compression on a nerve, such as when we hit our "funny bone" in the elbow (the Ulnar Nerve), we can experience shooting pain, numbness, tingling and weakness. When prolonged compression of a nerve occurs, such as a pinched nerve in the neck or low back (for example, sciatica), it can be extremely painful or even debilitating. A nerve that is commonly compressed and creates serious pain, numbness and weakness in the forearm, wrist, hand and fingers is called the Median Nerve, and it can be tricky, evading proper diagnosis and thwarting attempts at treatment. Its tendency to get trapped and compressed at multiple places from the neck to the wrist earns it the nickname the "Pinch Me" nerve.